Tag: Georgia

Georgia Politics And The American Revolution

picture of the three signers of the Georgia signers of The Declaration of Independence
The Georgia Signers

There were three signers of the Declaration of Independence from Georgia. These were George Walton, Lyman Hall, and Button Gwinnett.

Button Gwinnett’s signature is at the top of the first column of signatures on the bottom left of the Declaration.  His signature is one of the most sought after of all the men who were there. Gwinnett was a leader of the radical faction of the Whigs. The other Whig faction was not as enthusiastic for American independence. Those loyalists who favored British rule were called Tories.

Button Gwinnett was killed in a duel by his political enemy, Lachlan McIntosh, in May, 1777.  Both men were wounded in the duel, but McIntosh recovered and Gwinnett died three days later. His early demise less than a year after the signing has made his signature very valuable, and it may be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars in today’s market.

picture of the Declaration of Independence
Declaration of Independence

Gwinnett’s second in the famous duel was my ancestor, George Wells. He was a leader of the radical Whig faction. In early 1780 as president of the executive council, Wells acted as governor when Richard Howley, Governor, and George Walton traveled to Philadelphia as representatives to the Continental Congress.

picture of Button Gwinett
Button Gwinett

George Wells was killed in a duel on February 15, 1780 by a political enemy, Major James Jackson. The politics in Georgia during the Revolution were dirty and dangerous. The leaders of the radical Whig faction, Gwinnett and Wells, although killed in duels, had a lasting effect on democratic rule in the State of Georgia.

At one time, there were three state governments in Georgia. The Tories (Loyalists) convened in Savannah, and the Whigs, of which there were two factions, convened in Augusta. It was a confusing time, and choosing the winning side could be a hazard to your health.

Gwinnett County, Georgia was named for Button Gwinnett. It is in the Atlanta metropolitan area, and is one of the fastest growing counties in the nation.

She’s A Purty Thang!

baby picture of Georgia
Baby Georgia

Yes, she is. Her name is Georgia, and she is my two-year old grand-daughter. Her second birthday was last week, but her party will be today, the first available weekend.

The interesting thing to me is that she looks very much like her mother at that age, and also much like my wife. I can spot signs of my mother’s looks, too. That is one reason why grand-children are so precious. You can see not only yourself in them, but also the looks and mannerisms of other family members. Life is beautiful when they are young.

In my opinion there will never be a time when she becomes not-pretty. She will always be beautiful, but, she will mature in her personality, growing physically and mentally every day. Darn it!

Picture of Georgia Age 1 1/2
Georgia Today

Someday, she will be a teenager. God forbid!

There is a better than even chance that she will be like her mother, who was a beautiful girl, but drove us almost to insanity with her hormones coursing through her veins. As teenagers, girls are terrible specimens of the human race. Thank God Georgia is my grand-child, and I can turn her over to her parents for rearing during those troublesome years.

They all start out so sweet you could just crush them when hugging them. Then, they start growing up and slip into those awful teen years when everything you say is wrong, and nothing you say is heeded. Life is not fun during those years.

Then, sometime after college and a couple of dozen whacked-out boyfriends, she will grow up and become the person you wanted to raise in the first place. It is interesting that God brings us these tests of faith, knowing that not only will our children challenge our faith, but that those same faithless creatures will return to the values of their upbringing.

Life is good, and Georgia is our reward for a job well done. God bless grand-children.

Georgia Is Not The Pear State

Bradford Pear blossom pictureGeorgia is the Peach State. That is what all the license tags say, and we need to pay attention to our tradition.

Atlanta, we have a problem, and that problem is the Bradford Pear tree. This flowering perennial, once thought to be the perfect flowering tree, has become the scourge of the home owner. They flower early in the spring, and herald the start of the allergy season. The weather channel is forecasting tree pollen levels in the HIGH category this week, and the misery is starting.

Native to Korea and China, the Bradford Pear tree was introduced into the United States in the early twentieth century. It wasn’t until about 1963 that the USDA recommended the Bradford Pear for commercial and residential use. Things have gone downhill ever since.

Even though the Bradford Pear is considered a mild allergen, I have seen grown men break into tears when coming within a hundred feet of one of those overgrown bushes. Not since the introduction of Kudzu into our ecology have we been attacked so successfully by Asian nations.

With the blooming of the Bradford, men dressed in camo-clothes talk about dynamite and chain saws in the same breath. Women pushing strollers will go to the other side of the street to mitigate the nasal damage wrought by those decorative perennials. Neighbors plot late night tree-poisoning sorties against those who harbor those plant terrorists.

We need to get rid of those Asian pests, and find another flowering tree that is less obnoxious. How about the Japanese Cherry Tree?

It all makes me weep.