Category: television

Tanks-Giving

Battle Of Kursk
Battle Of Kursk

Oh my goodness! Here I sit enjoying a full belly on a Thanksgiving evening, and what do you think I am watching?

There’s a relatively new cable entertainment channel called, The American Heroes Channel. Today, it is all about tank battles in World War II. The current show I am watching is about the Battle of Kursk. There have always been films, newsreels, and other presentations of World War II battles, but the one on the American Heroes Channel are from a newer genre.

The American Heroes Channel presentations are a mixture of actual films and newsreels, personal interviews with both German and Russian tank commanders, and modern day animation of weapons, tanks, artillery, and battle action similar to popular video games. The AHC makes very good presentations.

Picture of Russian T-34 tank
Soviet T-34 Battle Tank As Used In WWII

The Battle of Kursk lasted for days and days. Almost three million men were committed to this battle, with almost two million sent by the Soviets. There were hundreds of thousands of casualties. Thousands of tanks were destroyed. Thousands of guns were destroyed. It was an epic tank battle, few of its like have ever been seen.

picture of a Tiger Tank
German WWII Tiger Tank

The ferocity of the fighting was one of the hallmarks of the battle, with the Soviets under orders to never retreat. Even when losing, the Soviets never retreated. Horrible casualties were inflicted on the Russians, but they outnumbered the Germans almost two to one. It was this advantage that won the battle for the Soviet Union. The Russians were able to throw more people and tanks into the battle.

The T-34 Russian main battle tank was the primary Russian tank, with the Germans bringing in Tiger tanks and other panzers, many of which were superior in weaponry and armor to the Soviet tanks.

Even though it is entertaining to see these programs about wars past, understanding the hundreds of thousands of casualties makes it a gruesome thing.

Thank God those days are over, and let us pray we will never see world wars, ever again.

Note: All pictures from Wikipedia.

Big Brother AT&T

Ya’ll aint going to believe this. It really happened this morning, and the folks at AT&T admit it. Here’s what happened.

I am a customer of AT&T Uverse TV, Internet, and home telephone. All my entertainment is delivered by AT&T, and they do a good job. AT&T is expensive, but after trying to deal with Charter Cable for year after year, I was glad to pay more for good TV, telephone, and Internet service. Plus, AT&T customer service is always friendly, and they follow-up.

This morning, I had arisen about 8:45, turned on the bedroom TV, and was in the process of choosing the day’s wardrobe. Since this is a Friday, and there was no grandchild care on my calendar, I was preparing to do some work around the house and yard. I chose the five year old, faded and slightly dirty, Wrangler jeans. Swooping them up from the floor, I also spied a rag of a shirt that was perfect for the activities planned.

That’s when the TV started making those Emergency Alert sounds. You know, the tones that sound like you have tuned into a fax machine. Along with the noise there was a red-bordered text box at the top of the screen that said something like:

“This is an emergency alert. Your television will be force-tuned to another channel for you to receive an emergency message. This action is being taken as requested by the White House. ASTGA02 (message number)…”

AT&T Uverse force-tuned my television from the Fox News Channel to the local NBC network affiliate channel and their morning news program.

To make matters worse, I could not change channels or look at the channel guide. AT&T had complete control over my television set, and they were supposedly being ordered to do so by the White House.

This had to be a really big emergency for such action, and I kept waiting for the emergency message. The message never appeared.

I power reset the TV, and it returned to the Fox News Channel for about sixty seconds, at which time the Emergency Alert Message and channel force-tuning was repeated. I did this three times with the same results. The same thing happened with my TV in the den.

When I spoke to AT&T customer service, I was told that AT&T network engineers had “quickly repaired a network problem” that morning. Upon further questioning, the customer service representative revealed that the problem was, indeed, the emergency alert message and it was a nationwide event for AT&T.

So, there we have it. A mistake that demonstrated the White House capability to not only determine what we watch, but quite probably what we are watching at any one instant.

This is not only unbelievable, it is unacceptable. There’s no way around this problem as the cable company, and telephone company, have the right and responsibility to determine the health of their network and attached devices at any time.

Scary, isn’t it?

Update:  http://money.cnn.com/2014/10/24/media/att-alerts/index.html and http://www.statesman.com/news/business/u-verse-glitch-freezing-channels-with-nonexistent-/nhrBh/