So, What’s In Your Future? 3

You have the same future as I. You will not make it out of this world alive.

I went shopping at Walmart this afternoon for some odds and ends, including some anti-acid stomach medicine. Walmart usually has good prices for this kind of stuff, and I will occasionally find some other bargains while just roaming around the store. While I was perusing the shelves in the pharmacy area, I began to wax a bit philosophic about all the products and their uses.

There were medicines to take care of indigestion and other digestive problems. There were some prominent displays of medicants to take care of the other end, too.

Then there was the big pharmacy counter where there was always a line of people waiting to pick up their prescriptions. I was musing that these drugs would be meant for mitigating high blood pressure, correcting heart rhythms, combating cholesterol, prohibiting conception, helping to expel waste, correct coughs, and make things generally upright. Medical science has come a long way in the last fifty years, and now there is a medication for almost every possible ailment, and some conditions that are not ailments.

Of course none of this is surprising to anyone at all. I realized that people rarely die from insanity or other mental problems. The brain can become diseased, i.e., tumors or Alzheimer’s. Generally speaking, the brain probably has a wear mechanism such that it, too, will quit working after a while. It seems that if the brain, like the rest of the body, is exercised continually, that organ most likely will last longer than otherwise.

What kills people is that our bodies wear out. We are like automobiles that are being driven varying distances under varying conditions. Along the way, cars get tune ups, but we don’t . There is no way to replace our spark plugs. However, there are ways to clean our fuel lines, but they are not very safe. You can replace a fuel pump on an automobile, but we have yet to learn how to reliably replace hearts. Kidneys, livers, and other organs can be handled, but they are in perpetual short supply.

So, we find ourselves wearing out and running down with one system after another in partial or total failure. Our internal computer does not automatically understand what is happening to our hearts, bellies, or kidneys. It only feels what the sensors were designed to tell us. We only know about the pain, and we sometimes don’t know the source of that pain.

Internal organs don’t usually have nerve endings like those on the skin. I am not sure how pain is signaled to the brain, but I do know that my former cancerous kidney was almost asymptomatic. There was no pain, and there were no symptoms.

Our hearts wear out. Our abused livers and kidneys falter. Our mufflers develop problems, and our emissions become critical.

What does not change for many people is how they think, and how they look at life. I have often said that attitude is everything, and sometimes it is. When we face life and our progression into eternity with a positive attitude, treating others as we would wish to be treated, then we can say that life is worth living. Life around others has a synergy. We feed off each other, positively or negatively.

We are important to each other.

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3 comments

  1. Thanks, Jim. That is a fascinating article. It seems that the electrical shocks stimulate the brain cells to operate more normal. I was thinking the same thing can be done with liberal amounts of Tennessee sipping whiskey. Instead of sipping, I choose to gulp the stuff. It is expensive but that way I can justify the liqour bill as health care.

    On the reality front, in the last three years, I went to a local tech college taking all the latest courses in web development, and competed well with all the kids. There were always some really smart kids in the classes, and I developed some pretty good friendships. One Pakistani girl was always competitive enough to pester me on my grades for every assignment, and every test. She beat me by a few points on the final exam, and that made her day.

    People tell me that keeping your brain busy will help keep Alzheimer’s away, but I have always thought that there are some other things at work. These things are physical (chemical), and cause the brain to gunk-up. Regular exercise undoubtedly will help, and doing mentally challenging things will, too. I will be glad to learn someday that a pill will be available to cure Alzheimer’s, and then I can relax and watch TV all day like the rest of the senior citizen population.

    Keep on doing what you do. I enjoy reading your stuff.

  2. George H.W. Bush parachuted out of an airplane at the age of 80. Now, he’s in a wheelchair most of the time — and not as the result of his parachuting adventure.

    The truth is this: if we live long enough, we’ll become both aging and ailing Boomers, some of us seriously ailing. That’s just the way the cycle of life is!

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